Oophorectomy

Oophorectomy is the surgical removal of one or both the ovaries. Ovaries are the prime female reproductive organs which are responsible for the production of several hormones, controlling the menstrual cycle and also producing the female gamete. Oophorectomy has to be done in the case of ovarian cancer, breast cancer, endometriosis, ovarian torsion or tumors in the ovary. An oophorectomy is often done along with a Hysterectomy (removal of the uterus) or a Salpingectomy (removal of the fallopian tubes). 

Know More About Surgery

The signs / symptoms that start to appear which indicate the necessity of an Oophorectomy include- 

  • Bloating in the abdomen
  • Pain in the pelvic region
  • Changes in urination pattern and bowel movements
  • Fatigue and Weakness
  • Changes in the appetite
  • Abdominal cramps
  • Difficulty in becoming pregnant

Ovarian cancer and other disorders of the ovary can be diagnosed by several imaging tests such as MRI scan and CT scan. A physical examination by the doctor feeling your abdominal region can help find lumps or growths in the ovaries. Blood tests must be performed to find substances produced by ovarian cancer cells. An abdominal ultrasound produces detailed images of the ovaries by using high frequency sound waves. A pap smear must be carried out to detect any other abnormalities.

Oophorectomy can be of the following types-

  • Unilateral Oophorectomy is the removal of one of the ovaries
  • Bilateral Oophorectomy involves the removal of both the ovaries
  • Salpingo-Oophorectomy is the procedure in which the fallopian tubes as well as the ovaries are removed

There are different approaches to an Oophorectomy such as- 

  • Open Abdominal Surgery- A large incision is made in the abdomen to remove the ovaries.
  • Laparoscopic Procedure- Small incisions are made in the abdomen and a laparoscope is used to get pictures of the ovaries. This procedure involves less pain, lower risk of infection and a shorter recovery time.
  • Robotic Surgery- This approach is carried out by a robot controlled by the doctor. It involves larger precision.

There are several risks involved in an Oophorectomy. There may be bleeding during the surgery and blood clots may also form. Infection may occur at the site of incision and scar tissue may form. There are chances of the tumor to rupture while incision which increases the risk of spreading of cancer cells. An oophorectomy may also cause damage to the urinary tract organs or cause a hernia. 

After an Oophorectomy, it is essential to take lots of rest and to not engage in strenuous physical activities. Sexual intercourse and using tampons should be avoided for at least several days after the surgery. There may be sight vaginal bleeding and discharge for which sanitary napkins must be used. It is necessary to keep walking to avoid blood clots in the legs and do minimal exercise.  

Oophorectomy from best Hospitals and Doctors in Mumbai Region

{{x.clinic_name}}

  • {{x.specialisation}}
  • {{x.locality}}, {{x.city_name}}
  • {{x.capacity}} Beds
  • {{x.doctor_discount_consultation}}

Summary:

{{y.doctor_name}}

Consultant - {{y.specialisation}}

{{x.doctor_name}}

{{x.qualifications}}

{{x.experience}} years experience

  • {{x.specialisation | limitTo: 1}} {{x.specialisation }}
    {{x.clinic_name}}
  • {{x.locality}}, {{x.city_name}}
  • {{y.day}}: {{y.slot}}

  • Fee INR {{x.rate}}

No Results Found!

Oophorectomy

Oophorectomy is the surgical removal of one or both the ovaries. Ovaries are the prime female reproductive organs which are responsible for the production of several hormones, controlling the menstrual cycle and also producing the female gamete. Oophorectomy has to be done in the case of ovarian cancer, breast cancer, endometriosis, ovarian torsion or tumors in the ovary. An oophorectomy is often done along with a Hysterectomy (removal of the uterus) or a Salpingectomy (removal of the fallopian tubes). 

Symptoms

The signs / symptoms that start to appear which indicate the necessity of an Oophorectomy include- 

  • Bloating in the abdomen
  • Pain in the pelvic region
  • Changes in urination pattern and bowel movements
  • Fatigue and Weakness
  • Changes in the appetite
  • Abdominal cramps
  • Difficulty in becoming pregnant

Diagnosis

Ovarian cancer and other disorders of the ovary can be diagnosed by several imaging tests such as MRI scan and CT scan. A physical examination by the doctor feeling your abdominal region can help find lumps or growths in the ovaries. Blood tests must be performed to find substances produced by ovarian cancer cells. An abdominal ultrasound produces detailed images of the ovaries by using high frequency sound waves. A pap smear must be carried out to detect any other abnormalities.

Treatment

Oophorectomy can be of the following types-

  • Unilateral Oophorectomy is the removal of one of the ovaries
  • Bilateral Oophorectomy involves the removal of both the ovaries
  • Salpingo-Oophorectomy is the procedure in which the fallopian tubes as well as the ovaries are removed

There are different approaches to an Oophorectomy such as- 

  • Open Abdominal Surgery- A large incision is made in the abdomen to remove the ovaries.
  • Laparoscopic Procedure- Small incisions are made in the abdomen and a laparoscope is used to get pictures of the ovaries. This procedure involves less pain, lower risk of infection and a shorter recovery time.
  • Robotic Surgery- This approach is carried out by a robot controlled by the doctor. It involves larger precision.

Risks

There are several risks involved in an Oophorectomy. There may be bleeding during the surgery and blood clots may also form. Infection may occur at the site of incision and scar tissue may form. There are chances of the tumor to rupture while incision which increases the risk of spreading of cancer cells. An oophorectomy may also cause damage to the urinary tract organs or cause a hernia. 

After Procedure

After an Oophorectomy, it is essential to take lots of rest and to not engage in strenuous physical activities. Sexual intercourse and using tampons should be avoided for at least several days after the surgery. There may be sight vaginal bleeding and discharge for which sanitary napkins must be used. It is necessary to keep walking to avoid blood clots in the legs and do minimal exercise.  

FAQ Section

1) What is oophorectomy?

The female reproductive system is comprised of the vaginal canal, uterus,  cervix, ovaries, and fallopian tubes. The ovaries are organs that produce eggs as well as important hormones estrogen and progesterone. An oophorectomy is a surgery done to remove one or both ovaries and may also be used to remove part of an ovary.

 

2) When should this procedure be performed?

Oophorectomy may be performed for:

  • A tubo-ovarian abscess
  • Severe cases of endometriosis
  • Noncancerous (benign) ovarian tumors or cysts
  • Ovarian cancer
  • Ovarian torsion which is the twisting of an ovary
  • Reducing the risk of ovarian cancer
  • Reducing the risk of breast cancer as it is stimulated by estrogen.

 

3) What are the types of oophorectomy?

Oophorectomy can be performed in two ways:

Laparotomy: In this surgical approach, the doctor makes one large incision in the lower abdomen of the patient to access her ovaries. The surgeon then carefully separates each ovary from the blood supply and tissue that envelopes it and removes the ovaries.

Minimally invasive laparoscopic surgery: In this curative approach, the doctor makes three or four very little gashes in the patient's abdomen and then inserts a tube with a small camera through one cut and special surgical tools through the others. The camera sends video to a monitor in the operating room which the doctor uses to guide his or her surgical tools. Each ovary is isolated from the blood supply and neighboring tissue and placed in a pouch which is then pulled out of the patient's abdomen through one of the small incisions.

4) What type of anesthesia is used?

Surgeons perform this procedure in a hospital under general anesthetic.

 

5) Will a female menstruate after going through an oophorectomy?

Removal of one ovary still lets a female to continue to menstruate and to have kids, as long as the surviving ovary is not damaged. When both ovaries are extracted, menstrual periods stop, a female can no longer become pregnant, and hormones like estrogen and progesterone are no longer produced in the female body.

 

6) Can other procedures be performed along with oophorectomy?

Yes, during an oophorectomy, other surgical procedures such as a hysterectomy or removal of the fallopian tubes may also be performed by the surgeon.

 

7) Are there any risks?

Some risks are universal to all surgery and anesthesia. The side effects of the anesthetic include: breathing problems, infection, bleeding, scarring, and death (Rare).

The side effects of surgery are:

  • damage to nearby organs
  • blood clots
  • bleeding
  • changes in sex drive
  • depression
  • infection
  • premature menopause
  • rupture of a tumor
  • Lower abdominal pain due to leftover ovary cells

8) What happens during oophorectomy?

There are two methods for performing oophorectomy. Both are done under general anesthesia.

In the first method,  the doctor makes one large incision in the lower abdomen of the patient to access her ovaries and then carefully separates each ovary from the blood supply and tissue that envelopes it and removes the ovaries. In the second method, the doctor makes three or four very little gashes in the patient's abdomen. He or she then inserts a tube with a small camera through one cut and special surgical tools through the others. The camera transmits video to a monitor in the operating theater which the doctor uses to guide his or her surgical tools. Each ovary is isolated from the blood supply and neighboring tissue and placed in a pouch. The pouch is then pulled out of the patient's abdomen through one of the small holes.

9) How long does oophorectomy take?

The surgery usually lasts about one to four hours. 

10) What to expect after the procedure?

Immediately after surgery, the patient is brought to the hospital’s recovery room until the anesthetic wears off. Nurses will are available if the patient needs any help. The patient is likely to feel groggy, sore, and possibly nauseated. After the patient has recovered from the anesthetic, she is transferred to a hospital ward for the rest of her hospital stay. It is common for women to wait in the hospital for two to five days after the oophorectomy using the abdominal incision method. Patients who underwent an oophorectomy using a laparoscope may be discharged earlier

11) Cost of oophorectomy in India?

The cost of oophorectomy in India can be anywhere around INR 200000.