C Section

A Cesarean Section is the delivery of the baby through the mother’s abdomen. It has to be done rather than a normal vaginal delivery in several cases when the mother or child’s health is at risk, there are chances of infections or if the baby is not in the correct position. A C-section may be planned or unplanned, however, is done very commonly now. After a C-section, the next delivery can be done in either way. 

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A C-section may have to be done in case of- 

  • Genital Herpes
  • Labor is slow, hard or lasts very long
  • Mother or baby’s health in danger
  • Incorrect position of the baby
  • Baby is too big or small

Regular sonographies can help detect irregularities in the mother’s womb. The position and size of the baby can also be seen. Medical history of the mother is helpful in identifying the risks she may have during the pregnancy and if it is safe for her to deliver her baby normally. Blood tests of the mother can diagnose the presence of specific antibodies that may be present and hence, infections like genital herpes or gonnorrhea can be identified.

A horizontal incision is made in the abdomen and another in the uterus. The amnion sac is then ruptured and the baby is removed. The umbilical cord is cut and placenta is then removed. With the help of stitches, the incision in the uterus is closed.  

There are several risks of a C-section such as heavy blood loss during the operation. There may also be possibility of infection at the site of incision. During the operation, there may be harm caused to other organs such as the bladder. There are chances of formation of scar tissue inside the pelvic region which results in blockage, pain and placental abruption harmful to future pregnancies. The rates of maternal mortality after a C-section are more than that of normal vaginal deliveries. The baby is at risk of being pre-mature in case the operation is carried out too early. The child delivered by a C-section is also more likely to have respiratory and breathing problems. There are rare chances of the baby also being cut during the incision resulting in fetal injury.

After 3 – 5 days, the mother can go back home. It is essential to take lots of rest and care as the postpartum period is essential for recovery. The uterus will start to shrink to its normal size which may cause vaginal bleeding for which sanitary napkins may be used. The patient must take walks regularly to get rid of gas after the C-section. The mother will have to start breast-feeding the baby soon after the operation. 

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C Section

A Cesarean Section is the delivery of the baby through the mother’s abdomen. It has to be done rather than a normal vaginal delivery in several cases when the mother or child’s health is at risk, there are chances of infections or if the baby is not in the correct position. A C-section may be planned or unplanned, however, is done very commonly now. After a C-section, the next delivery can be done in either way. 

Symptoms

A C-section may have to be done in case of- 

  • Genital Herpes
  • Labor is slow, hard or lasts very long
  • Mother or baby’s health in danger
  • Incorrect position of the baby
  • Baby is too big or small

Diagnosis

Regular sonographies can help detect irregularities in the mother’s womb. The position and size of the baby can also be seen. Medical history of the mother is helpful in identifying the risks she may have during the pregnancy and if it is safe for her to deliver her baby normally. Blood tests of the mother can diagnose the presence of specific antibodies that may be present and hence, infections like genital herpes or gonnorrhea can be identified.

Treatment

A horizontal incision is made in the abdomen and another in the uterus. The amnion sac is then ruptured and the baby is removed. The umbilical cord is cut and placenta is then removed. With the help of stitches, the incision in the uterus is closed.  

Risks

There are several risks of a C-section such as heavy blood loss during the operation. There may also be possibility of infection at the site of incision. During the operation, there may be harm caused to other organs such as the bladder. There are chances of formation of scar tissue inside the pelvic region which results in blockage, pain and placental abruption harmful to future pregnancies. The rates of maternal mortality after a C-section are more than that of normal vaginal deliveries. The baby is at risk of being pre-mature in case the operation is carried out too early. The child delivered by a C-section is also more likely to have respiratory and breathing problems. There are rare chances of the baby also being cut during the incision resulting in fetal injury.

After Procedure

After 3 – 5 days, the mother can go back home. It is essential to take lots of rest and care as the postpartum period is essential for recovery. The uterus will start to shrink to its normal size which may cause vaginal bleeding for which sanitary napkins may be used. The patient must take walks regularly to get rid of gas after the C-section. The mother will have to start breast-feeding the baby soon after the operation. 

FAQ Section

1) What is C-section?

Cesarean delivery or C-section is the surgical delivery of a baby, involving one incision in the mother’s belly and another in the uterus. Although common procedure Cesarean deliveries are generally avoided before 39 weeks of pregnancy. This is done to give the child the proper time to develop in the womb. However, sometimes, complications arise and C-section must be performed prior to 39 weeks.

2) Reasons for cesarean delivery?

Reasons for a cesarean delivery include:

  • Baby has developmental conditions.
  • Baby’s head is too big for the birth canal or her/she is coming out feet first.
  • Early pregnancy complications.
  • Mother’s health problems.
  • Mother has active genital herpes.
  • Previous cesarean delivery
  • Problems with the placenta
  • Problems with the umbilical cord
  • Reduced oxygen supply to the baby
  • Stalled labor
  • The baby is coming out shoulder first

3) Is cesarean painful?

During any type of cesarean section c-section where the mother has regional anesthesia like epidural anesthesia, she will still feel some sensations during the birth. She should never feel pain during the delivery. However, after the surgery has been completed and the effect of anesthesia has started to wear off, it is natural to feel pain from the cut on the abdomen.

4) Can you walk after C section?

You can start walking on the morning of the day after the surgery, as the catheter is removed by then. However, you still won't be allowed to climb up or down the stairs, and it won't be safe to take a bath until the incision has healed which generally takes seven to ten days.

5) What are the complications?

  • Bleeding
  • Blood clots
  • Breathing problems for the child
  • Increased risks for future pregnancies
  • Infection
  • Injury to the child during surgery
  • Longer recovery time compared with vaginal birth
  • Surgical injury to other organs
  • Hernia, adhesions, and other developments related to abdominal surgery

6) How long does it take to recover from a C section?

The mother should expect to herself stay in the hospital for three to four days after her delivery, longer if there are complications, and she should give her body up to six weeks to fully heal.

7) Is C Section A major surgery?

Because of all the risks involved and incisions made on the abdomen and uterus, C-section is considered to be major surgery.

8) How many cesarean births are allowed?

Cesarean surgery is a risky surgery. It is said that the mother probably shouldn't choose a cesarean if she wants more than two or three kids. The chances of a complication are high after a third C-section.

9) How can you avoid cesarean delivery?

  • Find a physician and hospital with low rates of intervention and C-section.
  • Educate yourself about birth by taking childbirth classes, reading books, and asking lots of questions.
  • Arrange for continuous labor support from a professiona.
  • Research for ways to cope with pain.
  • Ask your physician about how long you can delay going to the hospital once labor begins.
  • Avoid continuous electric fetal monitoring during birth.
  • Avoid epidural analgesia if possible.
  • Avoid induction.
  • When in labor, discover laboring and pushing positions that work for you to help labor progress.

10) Is C-section safe for the baby?

C-section is usually considered safe for babies. Its two only downsides are, that sometimes the scheduled C-sections are done too early and the babies are not ready yet, and in a vaginal birth, the liquid in the baby's mouth and the nose is squeezed out by the process of labor. In a cesarean birth, the baby needs some extra assistance to get rid of the fluids out of his/her nose or mouth.

11) Do C-section scars go away?

It takes C-section scars several months to fade away. You can speed up the recovery by eating well and taking in all the necessary nutrients that help in the creation of healthy tissues.

12) Is normal delivery possible after a C-section?

Vaginal birth after C-section (VBAC) is possible for many mothers, but there are factors to help them and their doctors decide if it’s right for them, such as the baby's and mother's health. The other deciding factor is the type of C-section scar on the mother's uterus. If their C-section scar is vertical, they cannot attempt VBAC as it is a very high risk that their scar could rupture when they try to have a vaginal birth. So, they’ll need to have a C-section again. But if the mother's C-section scar is low and transverse, then her doctor might allow her to try VBAC.

13) What are the side effects of cesarean delivery?

  • Fever.
  • Worsening pain.
  • Pain when urinating.
  • Increased vaginal bleeding.
  • Breast pain with redness or fever.
  • Increased redness at the incision site.
  • Drainage or swelling of the surgical incision.
  • Foul-smelling vaginal discharge.

14) Cost of C-section in India?

In India, C-section can cost you Rs 10000 to Rs 90000.